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Is it Worth it to Trade in Used Video Games?

Trading in used video games

 

No matter what video game system or systems is present in your house or dorm room or garage, you are most likely to accumulate old games that sit on the shelf, not to mention the systems themselves. While old games have some value to the consumer or the player, for the most part these games sit in their cases. Sure, sometimes the older games get broken out and taken for a spin on the Nintendo Wii, Playstation 3, or X Box 360, but for the most part these games are just taking up space. Usually the question pops up, should I trade these games in?
Like it or not, video games are a multibillion dollar industry that is likely here to stay. For that reason companies like Gamestop have popped up to offer instant store credit or cash for unused or unwanted games. There is a good chance a small store has popped up in your town or favorite mall that specializes in trading in video games. Even major retailers like Best Buy will offer a gift card for consoles such as the Nintendo DS, DS Lite, or the big three next generation consoles (Wii, PS3, X360). While these are completely viable options for getting rid of older titles, usually to purchase newer titles often this is not the best way to get the most out of the games. However, as with anything in this world there are pros and cons to using the service of a console trading or individual game trading company or store.

The Pros:

Getting store credit for new video games is always a great thing. Same thing with trading in used consoles. Sometimes, you can even get cash, other times even a store gift card is just like cash. Of course the main plus, is instant gratification. Trade the game today, get a new one today. Of course, many consumers love the no hassle world of video game trading. The “quick and easy” factor is difficult to supplant in many peoples minds.

The Cons:

You are not getting top dollar for your trade. You may end up trading for a game that costs $40 only to retrade that game in a week or so for $10 in credit. Therefore, trading for unproved games or consoles is generally unwise. Ask any seasoned trader, and the warnings will generally be the same: Know what you are buying prior to trading for anything.

Many companies that specialize in video game trading use data from the web to quote prices to consumers looking to trade games in. The companies make no secret of doing this, but still people are horrified to find out that game that costs $50 last year is worth $2 in store credit. Sticker shock can be very intimidating. Selling the games themselves via online auction, or at a yard sale or even on Craig list, is generally a more profitable affair. Of course, there is no instant gratification and there can be quite a bit of leg work involved in shipping and getting listing together. The bottom line is if top dollar is what you are looking for, generally selling the games or systems yourself will serve your game budget and your wallet better.

In closing, the short story relates to time and personal desire. If you want rid of the games or consoles quickly simply stop into the store with your would be trade in merchandise. However, if you want the maximize your investment in the games and consoles check out Ebay or Craigslist and see what folks are selling the games for, you will be surprised at the results.

sources:
www.gamestop.com
www.bestbuy.com
personal experience

Video Games that Revolutionized the Industry

Video games that revolutionized the Gaming Industry

From the mono color, clunky graphics of Pong to the full motion rendered videos of Final Fantasy XIII, video games have changed drastically in the almost 40 years they have been around. What once could only be found in a six foot tall box in an arcade now can be played on phones the size of a credit card. As games have changed, so has the industry, and many of the major changes have been spurred by specific, influential games. Presented below are the ten games that had the greatest impact on the gaming industry and continue to influence gaming to this day.
10. Final Fantasy VII (PS) – The Final Fantasy series is the most popular game series published by Square-Enix. This series has fans worldwide, most especially in Japan and the United States. While the series has sold well ever since the first game was released, the fan base was rather limited until 1997. In 1997, Final Fantasy VII was released on the PlayStation and sold unlike almost any other game in history. This game single handedly made the role playing genre of video games into a mainstream phenomenon. Without Final Fantasy VII, role playing games would probably still have a very limited fan base and World of Warcraft would likely not have become the juggernaut it is today.

9. Halo (Xbox) – First person shooting (FPS) games have been popular ever since Doom was originally released for the PC. Due to the precision of mouse and keyboard controls, FPS games were primarily the domain of the PC, with the few console versions generally consisting of terribly inaccurate control schemes. Between a combination of the Xbox controller and years of control scheme optimization, Halo was not only playable, but many experts in the field argued the controls were actually optimal to PC controls for an FPS. Whether true or not, the game opened the door to FPS console games which lead to the end of the PC dominance of the FPS market.

8. Mario 64 (N64) – The N64 did a lot of things wrong, which eventually lead to the collapse of Nintendo’s dominance in the console wars. Mario 64 is one of the things it did very right, though. At first fans and critics alike were skeptical of a 3-D Mario game, believing it couldn’t possibly live up to the predecessor games. Not only did Mario 64 live up, it easily surpassed the previous games in the series, in both quality and excitement value. With fluid and sensible controls for both Mario and the camera, Mario 64 became the standard by which all future 3-D games were designed.

7. Wii Sports (Wii) – Until 2006, the video game market was restricted almost entirely to boys and men between the ages of 10 and 25. The Wii gaming console changed that with the release of Wii Sports, which was bundled with every Wii sold. The easy to play game consisted of 5 different sports that were simulated by swinging or moving the Wii Remote in motions resembling those used while actually playing the sport. The incredibly simple mechanics made the game accessible to members of both gender and players of almost any age. With one game, casual gaming, a concept basically unheard of in the video game industry, had become popular and the Nintendo Wii has actively capitalized on the trend over the last few years.

6. Tetris (GameBoy) – Already popular on PCs and various gaming consoles, in 1989 Nintendo decided to use Tetris to try to springboard the sales of the GameBoy. The decision was sound, because this simple game set to traditional Russian folk music was a hit. The popularity of the GameBoy paralleled the sales of Tetris and despite having black and white graphics, sales of the GameBoy began to match traditional consoles. The jump start was all that was needed, as handheld games quickly starting selling as well as consoles, and in some cases better. Today, nearly as many games are developed exclusively for handheld systems as are developed for PCs and consoles.

5. E.T., the Extra-Terrestrial (Atari 2600) – The legacy of this game actually derives from how terrible the game was. Published in 1982, the game was developed in 5 weeks, in order to take advantage of the popularity of the movie with a Christmas release. The quality of the game was so awful that the game is generally cited by experts as almost single handedly causing the Video Game Crash of 1983. Having tolerated sub par games for years, video game fans finally rebelled and sales plummeted across the board. With Atari nearly going out of business, the lesson was hard learned, but the game forced the industry to improve game quality in order to survive.

4. EverQuest (PC) – Building off of text-based MUDs that were popular in the mid 90’s, EverQuest was one of the first MMORPGs. It provided a similar combat system to the MUDs, except with a graphic interface. Commonly nicknamed “EverCrack”, the game quickly gained popularity with addictive game play that, while common today, was never seen before. More than any other game, the rising popularity of EverQuest spurred the online game market like no other. Today, World of Warcraft holds the throne as most popular MMORPG, but the hundreds of MMORPGs in existence and the online play existing in nearly every console game both owe a debt to this game.

3. Mortal Kombat (Genesis) – For years, Nintendo followed a set of strict, self imposed rules to limit blood, violence, and sexual situations in its games. In an effort to challenge Nintendo’s dominance of the gaming market, Sega diverged from that path and actively included these elements in games. For political watchdog groups, already concerned about violence in video games, Mortal Kombat was the final straw. With clearly discernible blood and gore, the game heralded a cry and hue for a video game rating system. The exact process took a few years to be finalized, but this game is the primary reason for the existence of the ESRB and the video game rating system used today.

2. Pong (Home Pong) – The original home version of pong was not a console like modern day consoles. Instead of playing multiple games, Home Pong was simply a home version of the popular Pong arcade game. Two control paddles were built into the system and it could be hooked up to any television. Despite a high price tag, sales were excellent and Atari used the success of Pong to spur development of the original Atari home consoles. Without Home Pong, the console may never have existed as it does today.

1. Super Mario Bros. (NES) – After the Video Game Crash of 1983, many analysts believed that the console video game market would never recover. After three years of nearly non-existent video game sales, Nintendo dispelled that belief with the release of Super Mario Bros. for the NES. The graphics and complexity of the game were like nothing ever seen on a home console before, even surpassing many arcade games at the time. Just as surely as E.T. nearly killed the video game industry, Super Mario Bros. resurrected it. With the momentum started, Nintendo was able to release a stable of impressive games that kept sales running high for years to come. The very existence of gaming consoles today can be attributed to this superb video game.

Given the peaks and valleys that the video gaming industry has experienced, it is impressive at the level of success the industry continues to enjoy today. Great games and devoted publishers, developers, and programmers are all responsible for the continuing success of the gaming industry. While some of the previous games actually damaged the gaming industry greatly at first, none of the damage was permanent and the industry has grown and flourished in response to each of these influential and revolutionary games.

Baby’s Learning Laptop Toy by Vtech: An Affordable, Quality Toy

I’m not a fan of video games and computer software aimed at toddlers and preschoolers. The Baby’s Learning Laptop toy, however, is a little different. The Baby’s Learning Laptop by Vtech isn’t designed to be a video game type toy, but rather is just in a laptop-style and includes classic learning options appropriate for the development of babies and toddlers. The Baby’s Learning Laptop by Vtech is a toy that will grow with your child and can be enjoyed by a variety of ages.
The Baby’s Learning Laptop is brightly colored with the three primary colors and green. The Baby’s Learning Laptop opens and closes just like a real laptop computer. There are buttons on the keyboard area of the laptop toy and a screen or monitor. There is even a mouse located to the right of the keyboard on the Baby’s Learning Laptop toy.

Depending on what setting the Baby’s Learning Laptop by Vtech is on, your baby or toddler can learn about colors, shapes, or common objects. The lights, music, and audio on the Baby’s Learning Laptop are exciting for toddlers and infants and help to keep their attention. The keyboard buttons are large and easy to push and many toddlers love opening and closing the laptop again and again.

According to the manufacturer the Baby’s Learning Laptop is appropriate for ages 6 months to 18 months. While I do really like this developmental toy, I disagree with this age range. This is a great toy for an 18 month old and with the teaching of shapes and colors and words, the Baby’s Learning Laptop is a great entertainer for an older toddler up to at least 24 months as well. The flashing lights and fun sounds are entertaining for an infant, but the developmental aspects of the toy make it fun for an older toddler as well.

Because the Baby’s Learning Laptop is lightweight and portable it is a great car entertainer toy. Like so many toddler toys, The Baby’s Learning Laptop is noisy, but not nearly as annoying as many other similar toys on the market. There is a volume control and when the Baby’s Learning Laptop is set on the quieter setting it isn’t too loud at all.

At about $14.99 the Baby’s Learning Laptop by Vtech is also an affordable electronic toy. The two included AA batteries seem to last a while. Our son has had his Baby’s Learning Laptop toy for 3 months now, plays with it several times a week, and the first set of batteries are still working.

Overall, the Baby’s Learning Laptop by Vtech is an affordable, quality toy that might even entertain your child for a longer period of time than most toys. The Baby’s Learning Laptop toy is definitely worth checking out.

Breaking News About Giant Merger Between NBC and Comcast

NBC Comcast Merger

Internet access prices will definitely be going up in price due to the merger between NBC and Comcast that was approved today. One company will have all the control over everything that goes on with the World Wide Web. Once again, we have the FCC to thank for this.
The Justice Department approved this unprecedented consolidation of media and Internet power making a shift in the control of every aspect of electronic media.

A multi tiered pricing system is already in effect for various speeds to connect to the Internet.

On the lowest level is “economy.” Online access requires the purchase of at least a basic level of cable television to accompany the online access. What the basic cable level is the chart doesn’t list. The new, higher Internet access price is $26.95.

Five other levels range from economy internet which is ten dollars more than if you use the cable hook up along with the internet access up to the category of “Blast,” which is $69.95, the same as always. Though, previously, this Blast tier wasn’t very well publicized if it ever did exist in the past.

Don’t forget the monthly cable modem fee of five dollars. Qualifying for low income status gets broadband internet access for $9.95.

Eventually these kinds of mergers will eliminate any other competition and give NBC/Comcast complete control. Netflix is on its way out as a potential competitor. If this monopoly succeeds, there will be more – guaranteed.

TV, radio, and phones that are Internet based will be the only connection that delivers fast enough, or good quality signal to most Americans. This is not the good old free market competition that Americans have always known. The choices of services will most likely diminish to no choices at all.

Either buy from NBC/Comcast, or go without.

Now that these monopoly type situations have been allowed by the federal government, what other big mergers are looming out there?
Look for a possible merger between Alltell and Verizon.

The future of democracy and technology isn’t bright.

The airways were once controlled by federal government laws. These laws protected the people by ascertaining that the airways also belong to the people, and the provision of news and weather conditions must be freely available.

For now it appears, one must have plenty of money to spend in order to be informed. Vague wording in reference the cost issues included stipulations for “reasonable” pricing and “sufficient” bandwidth.

Hmm? Does that mean I won’t run into the every morning 6:30 clog up that freezes my computer on a daily basis? I’m on the lowest pricing index, and I believe I’m already getting “pinched” off.

We can always look forward to satellite TV. But if the government keeps caving to big business, the situation may not improve.

People must stand up for their rights. Contacting local government officials, senators, congressmen and women might put some pressure on folks to act in an ethical manner. Democratic Commissioner Michael J. Copps, was the only dissenting vote. He is quoted as saying that this “venture grievously fails the public interest.

If the government isn’t there for us, maybe we can look to the giant Internet companies to price themselves out of the business.